Congratulations America!

[Click for a larger image] Here in the United States, we just wrapped up a hard fought — sometimes bitterly so — passionate, and hideously expensive election campaign.  Without any incidents of rioting or significant violence.  For our overseas visitors: We elected a president, one-third of the Senate, all of the House, and numerous offices at the state and local level, not to mention voting on pages of ballot initiatives and proposed state constitutional amendments, all presented in some obscure dialect of Legalese.

We did it.  Congratulations to everyone who participated from any and all parties — to everybody who ran for office, worked the phones, walked the neighborhoods, donated money, and voted.  You did good.  You are truly warriors for democracy.

[“Obama in Charlotte,” November 3, 2008, by North Carolina photographer Katie Langley.  For information on this picture, please contact info at d-n-i.net]

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Filed in Uncategorized | 14 responses so far

14 Responses to “Congratulations America!”

  1. […] For a more on the election, please the see the post on DNI. […]

  2. armsmerchanton 06 Nov 2008 at 3:42 pm 2

    Yeah, I was pretty concerned about all those angry Palin supporters, torching the suburbs and “wilding” down Wall Street. Thank heaven there was none of that. ; )

    [CR: I guess you are too young to remember Chicago 1968.]

  3. armsmerchanton 06 Nov 2008 at 4:43 pm 3

    Chet

    I guess you are too old to remember what “irony” is. No hard feelings.

    [CR: Sorry — if you’re going to engage in irony on this site, you’re going to have to be a lot less subtle. If you want to see why I’m a little gun shy, you might read back over some some of the comments from right after the GOP convention, like these.

    You might be interested to know that first responders — police and fire departments — all around the country canceled leaves and went on alert Tuesday. What else could they do?

    The point I was trying to make is that when viewed in terms of fourth generation conflict, Tuesday’s election was vastly more effective than any military operation.]

  4. Maxon 06 Nov 2008 at 9:29 pm 4

    Sorry to rain on Chet’s big parade.

    “the pigeons are home to roost”

    What ever that cliche really means.

    What I understand is, that reality is setting in.

    More than anything else on earth, as emphericaly demonstrated over the last decades, Americans WANT only a gigantic Military Industrial Congressional Think Tank Services Sector Complex, Americans WANT to spend $ 1 trillion dollars + per-year on their military.

    They don’t care about their roads, health insurance, drug plans,
    scocial insurance, pensions , etc, but care only for the size of their military, and it’s continual expansion.

    Then, Better get used to actually Paying for it, and that means a
    lot more TAX.

    A lot more, then still more, and more, and more.

    Then we’ll see how enthusiastic Amercicans really remain about B-2 bombers, F-22s, nuclear carriers and attacking, invading and occupying this country and that, at the drop f the proverbial hat.

    We’ll see.
    M

    http://tinyurl.com/5twa5z

    [CR: Is there a point to this? Do you have any data to back this up?

    As I told armsmerchant yesterday, if you’re trying for irony, you’re going to have to be a lot less subtle.]

  5. loggie20on 07 Nov 2008 at 8:30 am 5

    The difference, I hope, between a republican and a democrat win on election day is the repudiation of the “cut taxes, borrow and spend paradigm common to Reagan and Bush II (Bush I and Clinton encouraged pay as you go).

    The financial meltdown is in part a recognition that one cannot print US dollars and play Las Vegas with the economy. The savings glut in Asia is not endless.

    The US government needs to shift from concern for the wealthiest one percent to concern for the well being and growth of the middle class. A message Obama seemd to tell. Now it is time to deliver.

    As to Max, I think he recognizes a hope of mine that an open debate about aircraft carriers, without neocon fear mongering, will cause a clear discernment of the opportunities lost to the society of building star wars versus investing in the economic infrastructure.

    Again a hope I have from some of Obama’s speeches as well as his retort on the KIA bracelets.

    Let’s decide things in terms of the greater good not some “white flag” cliche.

    In the US, 4GW is still waged at polling places on election day!

    We the people have won.

    [CR: “In the US, 4GW is still waged at polling places on election day! We the people have won.”

    Couldn’t have said it better myself, although I did try.]

  6. senor tomason 07 Nov 2008 at 1:03 pm 6

    “Without any incidents of rioting or significant violence.”

    Yes, we have come a long way. The first time a novice Congressman from Illinois with radical ideas was elected President we had a war as the aftermath.

    [CR: So we got that out of our system then. Although I’m a native of Mississippi, I rank said novice congressman as perhaps our greatest president.]

  7. Newjarheaddeanon 07 Nov 2008 at 2:07 pm 7

    A`HOY, Democracy Now, today’s program someone said Obama has the chance to be another Roosevelt or another Hover. I don’t know the history of those presidents or which Roosevelt he was referring to but it sounded good, anyways!
    On the Nov. 6 program, Mahmood Mamdani of Columbia University made a great point. He said (I’m paraphrasing) Obama has a similar opportunity as Nelson Mandela had in South Africa, but that it could also end the same if the movement (US citizens) did not seize the monument and keep things moving in the direction of change.

    Also a man named Ali Abunimah, was very up set with the pick of Mr. Emanuel as chief of staff. Talked about Emanuels family history pro Israel etc. IMO I’m recalling someone saying that Obama had said he was going to surround himself with people who would disagree with him not like minded people who would just go along with him. So here’s hoping that is what we are seeing.

    Whether it is better for a King to be loved or feared on a personal basis I say loved. And now IMO we are going to get a chance to see how much better it can be for this nation to have a King/President that is loved vs one that is feared. G-day!

    [CR: As I recall, Machiavelli agreed with you.]

  8. nimbus48on 07 Nov 2008 at 4:21 pm 8

    Who would have imagined on 9/12/01 that the “American” people would elect a half Kenyan with an arabic name? Voters in the US vote mainly SELF INTEREST as in $$! Will we ever get over the idea that it is all about some nebulous IDEALISM? About saving the world etc? It is time for Congress and the system in general to be open to a multi-party system that represents the many diverse groups in this country with real congressional seats! Maybe after the self interest is addressed openly we can get back to genuine idealism. That said. God Bless president Obama and may his tenure be the best of everything!

  9. Gortex6on 07 Nov 2008 at 4:25 pm 9

    What a disaster! One party secured power in all three branches of federal government; the only checks and balances the American people have is just enough for filibuster in senate. Plus, Obama the messiah pandered far too many promises at the podium to be taken serious; his hyped, up hope filled, smooth talk will be nothing more than bad hangover in a few months. As we head into a dark times, there will be plenty room for unforeseen blame in an oligarchy of democrats, especially when you hold them to the same standards of extreme scrutiny toward Bush and his neocon Republicans. The American people have spoken indeed; they gave democrats plenty of rope to hang themselves.

    [CR: “One party secured power in all three branches of federal government; the only checks and balances the American people have is just enough for filibuster in senate”

    In the first instance, I wasn’t aware that a majority of the Supreme Court had switched parties. Given eight years, though, it’s likely that Obama will put his stamp on the Court, as have all previous presidents who had the opportunity.

    As for “one-party rule,” did you make the same observation in 2000? And I’m a little puzzled about the “standards of extreme scrutiny” that someone gave to “Bush and his neocon Republicans.” When one starts a war on grounds that turn out be overstated, drags it on for longer than World War II, achieves no clear decision, and doubles the national debt in the process, one might expect some criticism.

    One thing about democracy: Not everyone will be pleased with the outcome.]

  10. Gortex6on 07 Nov 2008 at 5:26 pm 10

    As for “one-party rule,” did you make the same observation in 2000?

    I am basing my opinion on the past eight years, and the downfall of the neocon GOP. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me ;)

    [CR: Fair enough — hubris is always a danger when checks-and-balances breaks down.]

    When one starts a war on grounds that turn out be overstated, drags it on for longer than World War II, achieves no clear decision, and doubles the national debt in the process, one might expect some criticism.

    Yesterday, Obama began to recieve his initial series of national security and intelligence briefings. I am willing to bet he is being exposed to a sobering reality that is far beyond anyone’s realm of comprehension, anyone except President Bush. Unless you are god, you do not know the exact reason why he made those decisions.

    [CR: What could Bush tell Obama that would discredit what I wrote? Did Saddam have WMDs? Was he in league with Osama bin Laden? Did US involvement in World War II last 5 years, 6 months? Has Iraq become a secular democracy? Is the debt irrelevant?

    I remember back before January 1968, (some) Democrats said that criticisms of LBJ’s handling of the Vietnam War were unfair because “we can’t know what he knows.” If you are according George W. Bush god-like powers, (“far beyond anyone’s realm of comprehension, anyone except President Bush”) this may not be the best site for you.]

    One thing about democracy: Not everyone will be pleased with the outcome

    This is a two party corporate plutocracy, misleading a democracy.

    [CR: I’ll certainly grant you that our system is not perfect, but can you name a country anywhere nearly as large and diverse as ours that exceeds us in the practice of democracy? The best way to defend democracy — and to spread it — is not through cynicism or by showing monarchical reverence to an elected leader, but to practice it and continue to try to perfect it here at home.]

  11. Gortex6on 07 Nov 2008 at 8:04 pm 11

    What could Bush tell Obama that would discredit what I wrote? Did Saddam have WMDs? Was he in league with Osama bin Laden? Did US involvement in World War II last 5 years, 6 months? Has Iraq become a secular democracy? Is the debt irrelevant?

    Perhaps WMDs and Iraqi democracy never were the real reason, but a red herring to conceal political realism? What if Osama Bin Laden and Al Qaeda still is a CIA asset? Maybe we never intended to leave Iraq in the first place. Could it be possible that WWII was a military keynesian solution for the great depression? Did you know the federal reserve is a private corporation, closed from any scrutiny, and acts upon the interests of their shareholders and not the American people?

    I’ll certainly grant you that our system is not perfect, but can you name a country anywhere nearly as large and diverse as ours that exceeds us in the practice of democracy?

    Democracy in America is an illusion- a consolidated media and corporate pop culture marketing illusion. It is like watching a monopolized UFC promotion; they own both fighters.

  12. Gortex6on 10 Nov 2008 at 8:06 pm 12

    There is much truth in this satire.

  13. Rob Pon 11 Nov 2008 at 8:40 pm 13

    From CR: “The point I was trying to make is that when viewed in terms of fourth generation conflict, Tuesday’s election was vastly more effective than any military operation.” and “In the US, 4GW is still waged at polling places on election day!”

    How is political agitation for a major political party even compare to 4GW warfare? A 4th generation enemy is a non-state actor who does not work within the framework of a nation’s law. A bunch of people working for a major political party, whether directly paid by that party or not, is not a non-state actor. Also the fact that these political organizations work within the framework of federal election law should disqualify them from even being considered some kind of 4GW operation. Now if the “Sons of McCain” or “Obama’s Disciples” political organizations went door-to-door threatening known supporters from the other party to prevent them from voting or extorted campagne contributions from them, that would at least start to break into 4GW tactics, even if it isn’t origonal.

    Now if ACORN, for example, if found to have broken federal election law, at least we can start to analyze what they did within a 4GW context. If everything is legal, then they simply did their job.

    [CR: Rob — I was, I thought obviously, writing from the standpoint of the state actor.]

  14. Gortex6on 19 Nov 2008 at 3:34 am 14

    [CR: Your comment didn’t comply with our comment policy — we don’t cover partisan politics.]